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Tracks of the Richwood Tiger
Gymnasium


1962, page 82

At the floor-level entrance to the gymnasium and auditorium, the large plaque on the wall honored RHS students who served in World War II and the Korean War.

When admission was charged, all that was needed was a table with two chairs and a cash box. 


1954, page 48

The gym itself was laid out much like a plastic model that I constructed at home.

The permanent seating was on the west side.

At the top of the stairs, double doors provided access from the second-floor hallway.

Each of four sections contained about 80 wooden theater-type seats on metal frames.  In front of the first row was a steel-pipe railing.


1954, page 48

The basketball players’ bench backed up to that same railing.

While I was sitting in the close quarters on this bench, I found myself narrating the play-by-play of the action taking place a few feet in front of me.  That experience eventually led to a college career as a sportscaster.

What was I, a non-athlete, doing on the bench?  I was a student manager.

That’s me below as a freshman in 1961-62, awkwardly holding onto the ball in a portrait of our freshman team.  The coach is Bob Tuttle. 


1962, page 50

What did a manager do?  During games, my specialty was stats.

During practice, we spent most of our time cleaning the basketballs.  Here I am as a senior with Gary Glass, Larry Grose, and Harlan Burnside (front row) and Bernie Decker (back row).


1965, page 46

Our backboards were white-painted wood; there was no need for glass, as there were no fans in the end zone who would need to look through transparent backboards to watch the game.

The gym was so small that there was no out-of-bounds space underneath the baskets.  I explain here how we handled this situation.

Our only tall player was 6’5” Frank Carter.

 


1964, page 52

PET PEEVES:  ED MUSIC
Crowds at high school games (prefer Church League basketball)

PET PEEVES:  REX RADER
Smashed hats

The overflow crowd sat in temporary bleachers erected on the stage on the east side of the floor.  A “full house” would have been about 525 fans.


1965, page 53

In the Richwood Gazette for December 5, 1963, athletic director Fritz Drodofsky detailed the seating arrangements.

The Richwood High School athletic department wishes to apologize for the action that was necessary this past Friday evening.  We are deeply sorry [that] the doors had to be closed with so many of our faithful followers still on the outside.

There are 357 permanent seats in the gym.  The bleachers on the stage will hold approximately another 200, with about 30 of those [able to see] only ¾ of the playing court.

A block of 90 permanent seats are set aside for reserved tickets and student tickets have been on sale all week.  Ridgemont fans were on hand and quickly filled the remaining seats.

Looking forward to the remainder of the home schedule, it is not likely that a closed-door situation will arise again this year.  Two games which were felt might overtax capacity have already been switched to other venues:  the Elgin game to be played at Elgin and the Buckeye Valley affair to be played at Marion Coliseum.

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